Important free market communications legislation introduced in mid-December warrants flagging because it brings needed attention to a real and growing problem, how obsolete communications law stifles innovation, growth and consumer benefit.

See my Forbes Tech Capitalist post on the DeMint-Scalise bill, “The Next Generation Television Marketplace Act.”  

The unprecedented release of a FCC draft staff analysis opposing the proposed AT&T / T-Mobile transaction could backfire legally, undermining its intent to backstop the DOJ’s pending lawsuit against the merger.

See my Forbes Tech Capitalist post on the “Top Ten Flaws in the FCC’s AT&T / T-Mobile Competition Analysis.”
 

Netflix has self-torpedoed themselves a third time in just the last three months.

See my Forbes Tech Capitalist post here to learn how.

 

For those seeking to better understand how communications competition has evolved, expanded, and accelerated to cloud communications competition, don’t miss my new six-chart powerpoint presentation: “The Metamorphosis of Communications Competition,” here.

My bottom line conclusion: The transformation of communications competition requires a transformation in communications law.

  • Specifically, the world has changed with technology, but obsolete technology-specific laws have not.
  • Communications policy obsolescence undermines infrastructure’s utility and value and renders property less attractive and competitive.

I presented this new easy-to-understand framework for understanding exploding communications competition at a NetCompetition event today on Capitol Hill, which also featured excellent presentations by Jeff Eisenach, Managing Director of Navigant Economics, and Ev Ehrlich, President of ESC Company.

 

Netflix the Unpredictable

October 9, 2011

Netflix own actions have established the company as “Netflix the Unpredictable.”

See my October 10, 2011 Forbes Tech Capitalist post, “Netflix the Unpredictable” here.

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